Hahn (69) survives Shriners cut despite quintuple bogey

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LAS VEGAS – Coming off an injury to his right triceps tendon and making his first PGA Tour start since February, James Hahn was cruising along at 7 under par for the week when disaster struck.

With five holes to play in his second round at the Shriners Open, Hahn hit his tee ball at the par-3 fifth into the rocks short and right of the green.

Rather than take a drop, he elected to play from the desert, but his second shot went mostly sideways.

“From there it was a big blur,” he said.

His third shot sailed over the green and lodged into a rock wall.

So he found himself taking a drop after all – now from the sixth tee box, perched high above the fifth green.

From there, his fifth shot ended up short of the putting surface. That’s when he told playing partner Scott Stallings he needed “a timeout.”


Shriners Hospitals for Children Open: Full-field scores | Full coverage


“I was just tired,” Hahn explained. “I had hit too many shots, and I was like: I don’t know what’s going on – I could’ve ended up making a 20 if I wasn’t smart.”

One chip and two putts later and he was in the hole … for an eight.

“It’s like the old Seve saying: How did you make an eight?” Hahn asked, setting himself up for the punchline. “Well, I missed the putt for seven.”

Confessing that he didn’t even know what to call an eight on a par-3 – a quintuple bogey, by the way – Hahn started contemplating flights home.

But then there was the bounceback birdie at 6. And another at 7. And the near-ace at 8, where he settled for par. Suddenly just one off the cut line heading to his finishing hole, the par-5 ninth, Hahn went from one out to one in with an eagle at the last.

He played his last five holes quintuple bogey-birdie-birdie-par-eagle to make the weekend with a shot to spare.

“I like to think I shot 4 under in the last four holes rather than 1 over in the last five,” he joked.