Honda Classic renames media center after longtime journalist Tim Rosaforte

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The Honda Classic announced on Monday that it was renaming its media center after longtime golf journalist Tim Rosaforte.

Rosaforte, 65, covered the PGA Tour event in South Florida for three decades while working for local newspapers and national outlets, as well as a broadcaster for NBC Sports and Golf Channel.

“Tim has been such a vital part of the history of The Honda Classic from his work as a writer and broadcaster to the emcee of so many of our pro-am dinners and sponsor events,” Honda Classic executive director Ken Kennerly said. “It is only fitting now that he has retired from broadcasting that we find ways to honor him for his years of service to the game and to the community.”

Honda Classic media center renamed for Rosaforte

The tournament also announced the Tim Rosaforte Distinguished Writers’ Award, which will be presented annually. Rosaforte will be the first recipient.

Rosaforte, who is battling early-onset Alzheimer’s Disease, has had a distinguished career. He received the 2014 PGA Lifetime Achievement Award in Journalism and last year received an honorary membership in the PGA of America, making him the first journalist and just the 12th person ever to earn such a distinction.

He has written five books and won more than 40 writing awards. He has covered nearly 150 major championships and 17 Ryder Cups.